Logged (Off)

Indeed, the direction of the future is only there in order to elude us-

Recently, after a fairly spirited morning group ride here in Nebraska. I found myself warming up with a cup of hot chocolate at a local coffee shop. Savoring the warmth of the first sip, I overheard a group of fellow riders sitting comfortably near the front window. A slender, lively man reached for his iPhone near the center of the table to check his Strava stats. If you are unfamiliar with Strava? Good for you!

Gathering up my gloves, helmet and balaclava, quickly finishing the last sacred sip of my warm drink. I turn to thank the barista before being interrupted with the following question:

… Hey dude! Have you tried using a Strava when you ride? If you did – I thought we could have a friendly Strava Stat Battle Royal …

When I snap the buckle on my helmet, adjusting its fit before the pedals complete one rotation. Consciously I have made the choice(s) to LOG OFF - Taking a much-needed time out from my digital life. No matter how convenient, “handy” and productive technology has become, it is still my choice, (your choice) whether I remain tethered to it everywhere I go.

As a little dude, I had my fave superman pajamas and blankets to protect me from the monsters lurking underneath the bed. I took comfort with my imaginary friends and I refused to part with them under any circumstances (The movie Mr. Mom describes my childhood …). These transitional objects served to blanket me with comfort as I came to terms with my own individuality, and until I simply grew out of them.

Daily Meditation:

The gadgets we use today? Are our modern-day “security blankets“, distracting us from being alone with our true selves. Over the course of the next few posts, I would like to share some personal stories as to how I was able to toss my security blanket into the fire and my phone gadget thing into the trunk.

CultFit Ride

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9 Comments on “Logged (Off)”

  1. Joy says:

    My husband is on strava and sounds like “that guy”. I’m not because when I ride or run I’m not always going for speed or distance. People forget that they need to have low to moderate intensity days too. Anyway, you are such a great writer. Awesome post!

    • CultFit says:

      You are way too kind – Thank you! Some pretty cool things happen when you stop worrying about peak cadence efficiency and the Strava Gran Fondo 2 … I know too much about this stuff. ;)

  2. Maia says:

    First off… the monsters are not under the bed. I realized they’re in the closet. Have you ever read: There’s a Nightmare in my Closet by Mercer Mayer? Sooo looove reading this book to my son (actually he memorized it then) and to the kids at school many moons ago…

    Secondly… I don’t want to know Strava. As long as I don’t pass out at Spinn (or the treadmill *sticks tongue out*), I’m good. Jello legs, sure… but I’m goooooood… ;)

    Thirdly… I hear your phone dinging in the trunk. =)

  3. michelle says:

    I found out while marathon training that some of my best runs were when I didn’t take my phone. I don’t mean fastest, although they frequently were, but they were often the most enjoyable!

    • CultFit says:

      You touched on something that I feel is vitally important, especially when running and endurance events in general: Creating enjoyable moments. :) I have a long winded theory as to why … Here’s the short version: You have a great moment when running, maybe a fast split or you peaked a tricky hill in record time – You reach for your phone thingy to tweet, log or post your accomplishment … Then its gone, off into the webz … When we leave our phones at home, we create lasting memories that we carry in our hearts, our soul. These memories are tangible and real – Each and every time you smile, remembering. :)
      Be well today and thank you for stopping over!

  4. Heather says:

    “toss my security blanket into the fire and my phone gadget thing into the trunk.” YES!