Asi Sin Querer

People who make no mistakes lack boldness and the spirit of adventure. They are the brakes on the wheels of progress-

One would think that giving is something nice to do, something to celebrate, something to enjoy, something to embrace and yet, very often there is a great deal of discomfort and even embarrassment that surrounds giving.

Why is this so?

Is it that we’re worried what other people will think of us, whether they will approve of our gift, sentiment or words? Is it that we are expecting a certain result and become fearful that we might not receive it? Or is it that we somehow feel unworthy or insecure in the process of giving?

Notes:

Whatever the reason, the next time I “give“, I will be bold, I will give with every bit of my being, irregardless of the expectations I harbor and the fear gripping me.

Be well today and have a great weekend!

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15 Comments on “Asi Sin Querer”

  1. I love this. I was also told years ago, and remember it to this day, give without expectations. I have truly felt a freedom in giving when I give, knowing that my gift is for what ever the recipient wants of it. Great post.

  2. Sandra says:

    “People who make no mistakes lack boldness and the spirit of adventure. They are the brakes on the wheels of progress-”
    I love this. It is so true.
    Stifling.
    Dream killing.
    Defeating.
    I think is why people give up on giving sometimes.
    For four years, I was surrounded by very negative people and situations I could not escape. Or at least, I didn’t know how to escape. One of those people moved and I began to reconfigure relationships in the other sphere that balanced out all of the negative. It was only then that I relearned what it meant to truly give — and mean it. I gave before to make myself happier (it worked). It was as if I was living vicariously through their happiness.
    When I realized I could be happy too, I gave with the full intention of giving the recipient happiness. That is far more real, gratifying, and genuine than before. The happiness it gave me was not vicarious, but true.
    That was an important lesson for me. Thanks for the reminder. :-)

    • CultFit says:

      Thank you for stopping over today and I am so glad you enjoyed the post. I hope you guys have a an awesome weekend, take care. :)

  3. Maia says:

    Didn’t know you’re Spanish? ;) “… so without wanting…”
    I think of the word desire. Desiring to give. And what it means.
    “We want the things we don’t need and in the process of achieving to receive them, we come to find out we don’t want or even need these things. This is the beauty of desire and why desire is a good thing. We keep searching for wholeness and are tricked by all the “stuff” on the outside and think that these things are what make us whole.” – Mastin, tDL

    For most people who give, there exists that dependence to get something in return. We have been raised this way and can be very difficult to shake off. Not realizing that we need not receive anything in return when we have so much of it to give in the first place. Us alone cultivate it. Planting the seeds, nourishing, and growing. We tend to have the desire to get the seeds back, wanting more. This only means our inner garden hasn’t quite blossomed yet.

    Strange analogy, huh? Have a great weekend, Cult! =)

    • CultFit says:

      Do I know Spanish … ;) I wish you were in Omaha this evening to attend a Taoist Healing and Meditation ceremony. I’m excited about it! Your analogy is spot on and not strange at all. :) Please take care weekend and be well!

    • Maia says:

      Did you know that it’s almost a straight line from here to Omaha? Just a few km away… roughly a thousand!!

      Fine… you and Aleya are simply making me green with envy from all your workshop thingees. I can’t go to mine. grrrr…

    • CultFit says:

      I was looking at a map recently of Canada trying to figure out where the closest city with an NHL team is from here. Winnipeg is looking mighty tempting come this Fall/Winter. ;)
      Talking about injuries is tough, arduous and boring at times, but here goes nothing! After all the abuse I subjected myself to over the years.. I broke into pieces three years ago. I was pissed, bent, angry, moody – everything a woman likes in dude – Not! My wife and friends insisted that I still get out to help in the community: Volunteer at races, do more personal coaching and 1 on 1 stuff, attend more workshops, chill out and marinate in a healing environment. Even just going for a meditative walk were a blessing and they still are. Talk care this morning, time for my walk …

    • Maia says:

      You are fortunate to have family and friends with you. There are some people who may take on a similar path, kinda alone. Your reactions are expected for someone who is quite active. To be on a cul de sac can be very agitating. There are some who react differently. Nursing themselves quietly, showing a happy outlook yet very much running in circles in the cul de sac. Glad you’re doing your Spanish dance now. =)

      A secret as well… I happen to belong in that other group, that ‘some’ people. Shhh… but I’m smiling… see…?? =)))

    • Maia says:

      And just let me know when you do visit Winnipeg for NHL. I’ve only seen one game. Was given a ticket for box seating. Who can say no??! Free food and drinks, too!! ;)

  4. Susan says:

    Love this post! I really think that mine rests in being afraid someone won’t like what I’ve given or that I’ve went too far.

  5. I love everything about this post from the opening quote to the stunning image of the wave. Giving without expectations is harder than one might think. We usually have the expectation that we will be thanked and often that is not the case. But if a gift is truly a gift, there can be no strings attached. In that way, it is the same as unconditional love.

  6. A lovely post, and one that speaks to my deepest depths and fears. I dislike giving or receiving gifts for so many reasons. Even the gift of friendship is fraught with fears and entanglements. I have tried to be more bold, and called two of the women I met in the hospital. I feared calling for many reasons, one being they won’t really welcome the call despite giving me their numbers. It’s been three days since I left each a message, and my fears are kicking in. I will try to dispell my fears and simply accept what comes or does not.